find attorneys find lawyers professional lawyers find attorneys find lawyers professional lawyers find attorneys find lawyers professional lawyers find attorneys find lawyers professional lawyers find attorneys find lkkh
affordable lawyers - finding an attorney business attorney new york lawyer immigration lawyer disability lawyer find a lawyer dui lawyer divorce lawyer bankruptcy attorney family lawyer trademark lawyer criminal lawyer personal injury lawyer criminal defense lawyer tax lawyer
.Immigration Law Resources
What is Immgration Law
FAQs For Immigration visa
Where is my application?
Immgration Lawyers
.Criminal Law Resources
What is Criminal Law
FAQs Criminal Law
About Bail
Criminal justice
Criminal Lawyers
.Bankruptcy Law Resources
What is Bankruptcy Law
FAQ About Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy Process
Facts & Statistics
Bankruptcy Lawyers
.Labor Law Resources
What is Labor Law 
Employees Rights  
Federal Labor Law
Law For Wages Payed
Labor Lawyers 
.Employment Law Resources
What is Employment Law  
Discrimination Law
FAQs For H1B
Employer V/S Employee
Employment Lawyers
.Real Estate Law Resources
What is Real Estate Law
Real Estate Related Terms
Landlord and Tenant Law
Mortgage Law
Real Estate Lawyers
.Personal Injury Law Links
What is Personal Injury 
Establishing Your Claim 
Tips in filing lawsuit 
FAQs Personal Injury
Personal Injury Lawyers
.Business Law Resources
What is Business Law
Choose Type Of Business
Law That May Affect You
Legal Requirements
Business Lawyers
.Divorce Law Resources
What is Divorce Law
Is Divorce For You
Divorce Process
Save Cost On Divorce
Divorce Lawyers

 

About Bail...

 

What you need to know about bail -- what it is, how it's set, and how to pay it.


A person's first thought upon landing in jail is often how to get out -- and fast. The usual way to do this to "post bail." Bail is cash or a cash equivalent that an arrested person gives to a court to ensure that he will appear in court when ordered to do so. If the defendant appears in court at the proper time, the court refunds the bail. But if the defendant doesn't show up, the court keeps the bail and issues a warrant for the defendant's arrest.

How Bail Is Set
Judges are responsible for setting bail. Because many people want to get out of jail immediately (instead of waiting up to five days to see a judge), most jails have standard bail schedules that specify bail amounts for common crimes. An arrested person can get out of jail quickly by paying the amount set forth in the bail schedule.

The Eighth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution requires that bail not be excessive. This means that bail should not be used to raise money for the government or to punish a person for being suspected of committing a crime. Remember: The purpose of bail is to give an arrested person her freedom until she is convicted of a crime, and the amount of bail must be no more than is reasonably necessary to keep her from fleeing before a case is over.

So much for theory. In fact, many judges set an impossibly high bail in particular types of cases (such as those involving drug sales or rape) to keep a suspect in jail until the trial is over. Although bail set for this purpose -- called preventative detention -- is thought by many to violate the Constitution, courts have uniformly rejected this argument (the issue has never been decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, the ultimate arbiter of what is and is not constitutional).

If a person can't afford the amount of bail on the bail schedule, he or she can ask a judge to lower it. Depending on the state, this request must be made either in a special bail setting hearing or when the person appears in court for the first time (usually called the arraignment).

Paying Bail
Bail can take any of the following forms:

cash or check for the full amount of the bail
property worth the full amount of the bail
a bond (that is, a guaranteed payment of the full bail amount), or
a waiver of payment on the condition that the defendant appear in court at the required time (commonly called "release on one's own recognizance").
A bail bond is like a check held in reserve: It represents the person's promise that he or she will appear in court when required to. The bail bond is purchased by payment of a nonrefundable premium (usually about 10% of the face amount of the bond).

A bail bond may sound like a good deal, but buying a bond may cost more in the long run. If the full amount of the bail is paid, it will be refunded (less a small administrative fee) when the case is over and all required appearances have been made. On the other hand, the 10% premium is nonrefundable. In addition, the bond seller may require "collateral." This means that the person who pays for the bail bond must also give the bond seller a financial interest in some of the person's valuable property. The bond seller can cash in on this interest if the suspect fails to appear in court.

Getting Out of Jail Free
Sometimes people are released "on their own recognizance," or "O.R." A defendant released O.R. must simply sign a promise to show up in court. He doesn't have to post bail.

A defendant commonly requests release on his own recognizance at his first court appearance. If the judge denies the request, he then asks for low bail.

In general, defendants who are released O.R. have strong ties to a community, making them unlikely to flee. Factors that may convince a judge to grant an O.R. release include the following:

The defendant has family members (most likely parents, a spouse or children) living in the community.
The defendant has resided in the community for many years.
The defendant has a job.
The defendant has little or no past criminal record, or any previous criminal problems were minor and occurred many years earlier.
The defendant has been charged with previous crimes and has always appeared as required.

.

Popular Law Links - Attorney Legal Services

Criminal Lawyer Injury Lawyer affordable lawyers Personal Injury Lawyer Attorney Legal Services
Lemon law Tax Attorney - Tax Lawyer Bankruptcy Attorney Criminal Defense Attorney Family Law Labor Employment Attorney New Jersey Lawyer California Lawyer Megans Law Business Attorney Civil Right Attorney Texas Lawyer Real Estate Attorney Immigration Attorney Power Of Attorney Insurance Attorney California Attorney Criminal Defense Lawyer Immigration Lawyer Labor Law New York Lawyer Dui Lawyer Vioxx Lawyer Real Estate Law Florida Lawyer Injury Law Firm Family Lawyer Find A Lawyer Trademark Lawyer New Bankruptcy Law Bankruptcy Lawyer Michigan Lawyer Divorce Lawyer Employment Law

 

Alabama Lawyers
Alaska Attorney
Arizona Law Firms
Arkansas Lawyers
California Attorney
Colorado Law Firms
Connecticut Lawyers
District Of Columbia - DC
Delaware Attorney
Florida Law Firms
Georgia Lawyers
Hawaii Attorney
Idaho Law Firms
Illinois Lawyers
Iowa Attorney
Indiana Law Firms
Kansas Lawyers
Kentucky Attorney
Louisiana Law Firms
Maine Lawyers
Maryland Attorney
Massachusetts Law Firms
Michigan Lawyers
Minnesota Attorney
Mississippi Law Firms
Missouri Lawyers
Montana Attorney
Nebraska Law Firms
Nevada Lawyers
New Hampshire Attorney
New Jersey Law Firms
New Mexico Lawyers
New York Attorney
North Carolina Law Firms
North Dakota Lawyers
Ohio Attorney
Oklahoma Law Firms
Oregon Lawyers
Pennsylvania Attorney
Rhode Island Law Firms
South Carolina Lawyers
South Dakota Attorney
Tennessee Law Firms
Texas Lawyers
Utah Attorney
Vermont Law Firms
Virginia Lawyers
Washington Attorney
West Virginia Law Firms
Wisconsin Lawyers
Wyoming Attorney
Washington DC Law Firms

 

affordable lawyers

Disclaimer: The information provided on this website is not intended to be legal advice, but merely conveys general information related to legal issues commonly encountered. Your access to and use of this website is subject to additional terms and condititons. All contents, including text, graphics, images & information available on or through this Web site are for general informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Never disregard professional legal advice, or delay in seeking it, because of something you read on this website. You are encouraged to consult your attorney with regard to information contained on or through this Web site. Click here to read further.... Copyright 2002 KINGERSONS INC. All rights reserved. Affordable Lawyers state wise.

affordable lawyers

Ac For Sale | Summer Sale | Affordable Lawyers | Air Conditioner Sale | Portable Evaporative Coolers | Air Conditioner Discount | Air Conditioners Reviews | American Law Firms | ACS Student Loan | US Apparel | Florida Beach Hotels | City Attorney | Ductless Ac | Split Air Conditioner | Ductless Heat Pump | Eye Treatment | Find Attorney | New Smyrna Homes | New Smyrna Beach Realty | New York Doctors | Volusia Property | Volusia County Real Estate | Florida Vacation Rentals | Remedies For Acid Reflux | Home Air Conditioner | Mini Split Ac | New Smyrna Real Estate | Portable Air Conditioners | Professional Lawyers | Split AC | Air Conditioner For Sale | State Lawyer | Appliance Store | Teen Beauty | Ways For Teenagers To Make Money | Woman Perfume | Woman Squad | Crew Women | Women Quad | Online Best Casino | Largest Casino In The World | Carrier Air Conditioning

Site Designed & Maintained by Advance Infotech Inc.